May 26, 2018

What are your costs of distribution?

A cost that is often overlooked when deciding on prices, or considering profitability is the cost of getting your product or service to the customer. Whether it is you travelling to a meeting at your customer’s location or the cost of postage and packaging, they are each costs you would not incur if you had not made the sale.

What bought this home to me was the cost of distribution of my, soon to be launched, book. I could buy padded envelopes from W H Smiths at 99p each (or 3 for 2) or I could buy 100 for under £10 with free delivery on 300 or more. That was just the first cost. There was then the cost of postage. I am glad I have a franking machine but it still over £1 second class.

The costs can mount as much and more when delivering yourself. Parking at the station, the cost of the train fare, taxi to and from at the other end. I know that today I will spend more on taxis than the pre-booked train fare but this is still cheaper than driving at 45p per mile – and I can get some work done on the train. This cost of travel can make quite a dent in the daily rate. I know I am doing more work locally and from my office. I have no travelling costs or time involved so I don’t have t have the conversation about why they should pay for me to go to them. To be fair, my daily rate is less when they come to me as I know I can do chargeable work when I would otherwise have dead time while I was in the car.

If you have engineers or technicians on the road, just consider what the costs are. I am not saying you shouldn’t offer the service, I am saying make sure you build in the cost when calculating the price. The idea of being in business is to make a profit, not just deliver a fantastic service. If you don’t make a profit, you will not be able to continue which means that people will be deprived on the quality products and services you offer. If you do not get the figures right, you cannot continue.

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